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Hound’s-tongue

 

 

(Cynoglossum officinale)

Hound’s-tongue (Cynoglossum officinale) is a biennial to short-lived perennial, and is considered noxious under the BC Weed Control Act. Hound’s-tongue is found on dry pasture, roadsides, and logged forestland. Found primarily in the southern interior of BC, it is a major concern in the Kootenay, Okanagan, Thompson, and Cariboo areas.

Mature hound’s tongue plants have a woody taproot, with rough, hairy, wide leaves and dull reddish-purple, five-petal flowers. Each flower produces four rounded-triangular seeds covered with hooked prickles. Growing 0.5-1.2 metres tall, stems leaves are short and stalkless. First year plants form a rosette with leaves hanging down to resemble the shape of a dog’s tongue.

Each plant produces 2,000-4,000 barbed seeds a year that cling easily clothing, livestock and wildlife, resulting in new infestations spread over great distances. Hound’s-tongue decreases forage production on rangeland and pastures. Barbed seeds that cling stubbornly to the hair, wool and fur of animals increase stress on animals and veterinary costs and decreasing market value.

Warning: Hound’s-tongue contains toxic alkaloids that can cause liver damage in cattle, deer, pigs, horses, and goats.

Refer to Weeds BC for information on prevention and control methods.

Weeds in British Columbia

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