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Prevention TIPS

We are privileged to live in BC, where we enjoy the vast, natural beauty of its wilderness, vibrant urban centres, limitless opportunities for year round outdoor recreation, and character-rich small towns—it’s possible to discover hidden natural treasures around every corner!

So it’s important that we take ownership, and be accountable to our surroundings. Part of accomplishing this is considering how we can protect our province from invasive species. You might be surprised how simple it can be to form new habits, and create positive change. Read on to find out how your hobbies or workplace can be a good place to start….

Prevention TIPS:

Gardeners
Outdoor Enthusiasts
Boaters and Anglers
Travellers
Transportation/Utility Workers
Natural Resource/Field Workers

Gardeners

  • CPTweedpull08 001_CIPC_Garden
    Community Weed Pull. Photo: CIPC
    Learn to recognize the plants that you see. If you see a plant that looks out of place, report it to 1-888-WEEDSBC (933-3722).
  • Choose plants wisely. Consider replacing fast-spreading invaders such as English ivy, periwinkle or lamium with non-invasive or native alternatives.
  • Deadhead (cut) flowers, seed pods and berries of invasive plants.
  • Participate in local efforts to control invasive plants, join a Communities Pulling Together weed pull in your local area.
  • Avoid ”recycling” or “composting” garden debris. Dispose of all seeds and plant parts, including stems and roots, in trash bags for deep burial at your local landfill. For additional disposal methods call 1-888-WEEDSBC (933-3722) or contact your regional invasive plant committee.
     

For more ways you can help, please refer to the Grow Me Instead booklet. For details on selecting non-invasive bird and wildflower seed mixtures, refer to the Seed Mixtures T.I.P.S.


Outdoor Enthusiasts

  • Seeds HikingBoots_JLeekie
    Seeds on hiking boots. Photo: J. Leekie
    Invasive seeds can hitch a ride on your gear, boots and vehicle, so scrape and spray off any caked-on soil before entering or leaving an area.
  • Avoid carrying invasive seeds into your favourite natural areas by bringing weed-free hay and sourcing firewood within a 50-mile radius of your campsite.
  • Recognize and report invasives. If you see a plant or species that looks out of place, report it to 1-888-WEEDSBC.


Boaters and Anglers – CLEAN-DRAIN-DRY

  • Boat Trailer002_OFAH
    Invasive plants on boat trailer and motor. Photo: Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters
    CLEAN off plant parts, animals and mud from your boat and equipment. Use a car or boat wash station if available. For motorized boats, look closely at the hitch, rollers, motor, propeller, axle, and bilge. For non-motorized boats, look along the paddles and the hull.
  • DRAIN everything that can hold water on to dry land (e.g. buckets, wells, bilge and ballast). Your motor, wet well and bilge should be entirely drained on land after leaving the water.
  • DRY all items completely before launching into another body of water.
  • Recognize and report invasives. If you see an aquatic plant, fish, or other organism that looks out of place, report it to 1-888-WEEDSBC.


Travellers

  • zucchini-plantinbag
    Transfer of zucchini plant.
    Know the origin of what you're buying. Imported goods are often pathways for invasive plants.
  • Buy local when you have the option. Be careful to declare all food and plant materials—fruits and vegetables, plants, insects and animals can carry pests or become invasive themselves.
  • Ensure that the plants you are bringing into BC are not listed as invasive for this province or the local area.


Transportation/Utility Workers

  • Truck-washing JLeekie
    Cleaning of equipment after maintenance activities. Photo: J.Leekie
    Inspect and clean vehicles and equipment, including tires and undercarriage, before entering or leaving an infested area. Remove and bag invasive plant seeds and plant parts,and dispose of waste at a landfill or other designated disposal site.
  • Use only invasive plant-free fill material, including soil and gravel. Soil that has been excavated should not be re-used before appropriate treatment.
  • Avoid parking, turning around, or staging equipment in invasive plant infestations or mow prior to use. Keep equipment yards and storage areas free of invasive plants.
  • Wash equipment after returning it to the maintenance yard.
  • Recognize and report invasives. If you see an invasive plant that looks out of place, report it to 1-888-WEEDSBC.


For additional information on best practices for roadsides, see the Highways Operations T.I.P.S. or the Best Practices for Managing Invasive Plants on Roadsides: A Pocket Guide for British Columbia's Maintenance Contractors
 

Natural Resource/Field Workers

  • Hot-Spots Kamloops003_ISCBC
    Field inspection for invasive plants, Kamloops. Photo: ISC
    Inspect and clean vehicles and equipment, including tires and undercarriage, before entering or leaving an area. Remove and bag invasive plant seeds and plant parts, and dispose of waste at a landfill or other designated disposal site.
  • Determine priority invasive plant species within your operating area. Stay informed through collaborations with regional experts, and assist staff and contractors to identify and minimize spread of invasive plant species within your operating area. Recognize and report invasives.
  • Carry out regular surveys and record the locations of invasive plants in your operating area.
  • Minimize unnecessary soil disturbance during road, landing, skid trail construction and during site preparation. Ensure soil being moved does not contain invasive plant parts and seeds.
  • Wash/remove plant parts and seeds from personal gear, equipment, vehicles and machinery before leaving infested sites.
  • Re-vegetate disturbed areas as soon after disturbance as possible.
  • If you see a plant or species that looks out of place, report it to 1-888-WEEDSBC (1-888-933-3722).


For more detailed information on best practices for Forestry Operations and restoration activities, applicable to other resource sectors, see the
Forestry Operations and Seed Mixture T.I.P.S

In Your Words...

  • “Thank you for orchestrating access to the Hot Spots crew for GINPR.  This crew allowed us to move the restoration project on Princess Margaret ahead by months if not by years.”

    Wayne Bourque, Superintendent of Gulf Islands National Park Reserve, Parks Canada

  • “Our crew has finished their work at Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site and Gulf Islands National Park Reserve. I want to thank you, on behalf of Parks Canada, for providing the crew to us. They were well-trained and got a lot of important restoration work done in our nationally-important heritage areas.”

    Brian Reader, Species at Risk Manager, Parks Canada

  • “Parks Canada and Canadians have benefited from the partnership to have on-the-ground Hot Spots crews, and we would be happy to work with a crew in the future at one of our many national parks and national historic sites that are in need of invasive plant management.”

    Brian Reader, Species at Risk Manager, Parks Canada

  • “I am impressed with the coverage of the GIS mapping data now available. I will be developing an Invasive Species Management Plan for Pacific Spirit over the next several years and these maps will help as a coarse indication of current conditions, and in guiding initial inventory and monitoring efforts.”

    Markus Merkens, Pacific Spirit Park area manager, Metro Vancouver

  • "We had a great hike at Kenna Cartwright Park. The kids built a snowman and we all enjoyed the views. The outreach worker showed us some plants that don't belong in the park, gave us info about them and what to do about them, and gave us all some cool gifts from the Invasive Plant Council. Thank you!"

    Susan Hammond, Kamloops Young Naturalist Club

  • “Working with the Hot Spots crew in Saanich in 2010, we practiced different methods to treat knotweed with glyphosate using the injection gun on several sites. With these skills I was able to implement Saanich's first knotweed eradication pesticide treatment program for private properties.”

    Donna Wong, Environmental Stewardship Officer, District of Saanich

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